Electronics Conceptual Basis

Discussion of electricity, electronics, electrical components and theories of circuit operation.
Post Reply
User avatar
bperet
Posts: 1199
Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2004 1:43 am
Location: 7.5.3.84.70.24.606
Contact:

Electronics Conceptual Basis

Post by bperet » Sun Jun 17, 2012 8:26 am

RS2 uses these premises for electronics and electricity:
  1. The electron is actually the cosmic positron; no material electron exists. Larson's m-electron and the c-positron are both 1D rotating units of space. The primary difference being that a cosmic particle has its displacement in the space region and is nonlocal, therefore not being directly observable nor measureable. A material electron would be a measurable particle, just like the others. (Larson has 2 electrons and 2 positrons, material and cosmic. RS2 considers the electron is just the name for the c-positron, and no special electron structure exists.)
  2. The electron has two states, unchargted (rotational space only) and charged (trapped photon motion, creating a rotational vibration in time).
  3. The uncharged electron is considered the positive "charge," or "hole," in conventional electronic theory. (Considered a "hole" because it is cosmic and not directly observable). There is no positive charge on the uncharged electrion (obviously), and uncharged electrons do not repel each other inside a conductor. They are the carrier of electric current, and have units of "s" (space).
  4. The charged electron is the negative charge, a 1D rotational vibration in time, the inverse aspect of the spatial rotation. This gives the charged electron units of energy, t/s, and the charge, being temporally displaced, makes the electron appear as a point particle--static electricity. Charged electrons repel each other, because of the charge present.
  5. Both charged and uncharged electrons are present in a conductor.
  6. Uncharged electrons do not repel, and are distributed evenly across the cross-section of a conductor. They stay trapped within the conductor, the "time" of the atomic displacements where they can move freely between atoms, since electron space to atomic time, s/t, constitutes motion.
  7. Uncharged electrons exist INSIDE the atom, not in the space between. Electron space to vacuum space, s/s, is not motion, so electrons stay trapped in a conductor.
  8. Electrons in motion through a conductor are s per clock time, t, giving units of current, s/t (speed).
  9. Charge electrons repel, and are distributed over the surface area of a conductor (static electric behavior, also known as "skin effect"). Because the charge is a vibration, it is only effect 1/2 of the time, so charge electrons can be lost to the environment, which is why a conductor usually contans some kind of dielectric, insulating material surrounding them to prevent these environmental losses.
  10. Material, uncharged positrons, being a rotating unit of time, are trapped within the rotating time structure of atoms, adding to their electric displacement.
  11. Material, charged positrons have their charge in space, and are the observed, "positive charges."
  12. Voltage is the ratio between the number of charged electrons to uncharged electrons present in a conductor (Rainer Huck discovery). The units for voltage are therefore t/s / s = t/s2, which are equivalent to mechanical units of force. Because voltage is a reciprocally-related ratio, many electronic devices will have a preference for either voltage or current, not both. In general, capacitors prefer voltage, inductors prefer current.
The primary difference with Larson's electronics is the identification of the electron as a c-positron, and that there is no physical need for a material or cosmic electron to exist.

The primary difference with conventional theory is the recognition of the uncharged electron as the "hole" and that electrons move through the atom, not around it.
Every dogma has its day...

User avatar
bperet
Posts: 1199
Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2004 1:43 am
Location: 7.5.3.84.70.24.606
Contact:

Natural DC units, Current and Electrostatics

Post by bperet » Mon Jun 18, 2012 3:02 pm

In the Reciprocal System, everything can be reduced to units of space and time, and electronics is no exception. The basic, direct current (DC) units are:
Concept Symbol Electric Current Electrostatics
Current I s/t amperes t/s statamperes
Voltage V t/s2 volts s/t statvolts
Resistance R t2/s3 ohms s2/t2 statohms
The basic relationship of V = IR works for both electric current (uncharged electron perspective) and electrostatics (charged electron perspective):

Electric current
V (t/s2) = I (s/t) R (t2/s3)

Voltage (force) = Current (speed) x Resistance (see below).

Electric current is based on the concept of electric quantity, namely how many uncharged electrons are moving at a given time (the s/t relation for current). In a quantity system, voltage becomes the "energy per distance", t/s / s = t/s2, or force, analogous to its mechanical counterpart.

Larson considers the concept of resistance to be "mass per unit time", t3/s3 / t = t2/s3. The units are correct, but the concept does not fit the mechanical analogy for a quantity-based relationship.

A better interpretation would be to use the mechanical concept of "momentum per unit distance," t2/s2 / s = t2/s3, just as voltage is "energy per unit distance." With this interpretation, we have simple, mechanical concepts on both sides of the equation and maintain a logical coherence between them.

Electrostatics
V (s/t) = I (t/s) R (s2/t2)

Voltage (speed) = Current (energy) x Resistance (c2)

Electrostatics are based on the concept of electric energy (charge), the reciprocal perspective of electric current. As demonstrated by the units of current, energy and speed are inversely related, so the basis is the "energy of current", rather than the "quantity of current."

In order to get from quantity to energy, one must remove the "per unit distance" from the equation, since that is inherent in energy (mechanical work, time per unit distance). Take the electric current formula, and remove the "per distance" by multiplying both sides by a unit of space:

V (t/s2) * s = I (s/t) R (t2/s3) * s

becomes

V (t/s) = I (s/t) R (t2/s2)

Since we want the energy perspective for current, s/t, just invert the equation to change s/t to t/s:

1 / (V (t/s)) = 1 / (I (s/t) R (t2/s2))

becomes

V (s/t) = I (t/s) R (s2/t2)

Voila, the electrostatic relation emerges.

Electric current and electrostatics are just inverse views of the same thing.

Electrostatic resistance (statohms) is simply "inverse momentum," which is often included in physics equations as c2, the speed of light squared, because this inverse momentum is usually at a constant value. (Note that it does not have to be.)
Every dogma has its day...

Post Reply