A Gamma ray burst, the Schumann resonance and a Tsunami

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Djchrismac
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Joined: Fri Nov 08, 2013 7:14 pm

A Gamma ray burst, the Schumann resonance and a Tsunami

Post by Djchrismac » Mon Mar 09, 2020 3:48 pm

https://abruptearthchanges.com/2019/12/ ... r-history/

A Gamma ray burst, the Schumann resonance and a Tsunami (excerpt from Solar History)

Image

15 years ago, the Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami occurred on the 26th of December, 2004 with the epicenter off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. 230,000 people died. The shock had a moment magnitude of 9.1–9.3.

Barely 30 hours later, a strong Gamma ray burst from space arrived at Earth, changed the Schumann resonance and lowered its frequencies.(i)

Since we know that earthquakes can be influenced by space weather, this is an extraordinary coincidence.

“The burst was recorded at December 27, 2004 21:30:26.5 UTC, from the source 1806−20 in the constellation of Sagittarius. The burst arrived from the galaxy at a distance of 30–40 thousand light years and illuminated the Earth’s dayside.”(ii)

“Since the ionosphere carries the positive electric charge, its vertical displacement causes a current which serves as a “parametric” impulse source of the electromagnetic field. The global size of the source results in that the pulse contains only the lower Schumann-resonance frequency.”

The gamma rays lowered the ionosphere over the dayside of the globe and modified the Schumann resonance spectra. (iii) Only two other high-power bursts of cosmic gamma-ray radiation have been recorded in recent decades, the first August 27th, 1998 from the large Magellanic Cloud. No disturbance of the Schumann-resonance was recorded in this case. But in 2004:

“The ionospheric disturbance center was located in the middle of the Pacific at a distance of about 450 km from the center of the dayside hemisphere, […] the gamma-ray burst descended the ionospheric altitude by 20 km, and the disturbance itself existed for an hour.”

Dec 27th, 2004 was one day AFTER the Indian Ocean Tsunami. The earthquake occurred on the 26th of December at 00:58:53 UTC with the epicenter off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. Since gamma rays travel at the speed of light, they could not have caused the earthquake and tsunami. Unless It will turn out that energy from the same source arrived at earth before the gamma rays. This would require electrons or electric fields or cosmic ray particles such as muons, could indeed travel at speeds greater than the speed of light, as suggested for instance by physicist Wal Thornhill, and supported by recent findings at CERN. Recall that muons from space can trigger explosive volcano eruptions and therefore also earthquakes. (iv)

The SRs have been monitored only since the late 1960’s, thus the long-term connections are not known in detail.

I invite you to go back and recall whether something important happened in your life around Dec 27th, 2004. I know several people who made very important decisions and changes in their personal lives in these days. If you have a personal story of a particular life choice in these days, feel free to support my research by leaving it in the comments or send me a private message under “contact me”.
Faster than light motion ahead of a gamma ray burst was mentioned there, very interesting, I wonder if anyone has tied up changes in the Schumann Resonance with gamma ray bursts from elsewhere or during key earthquakes or volcanic events? The easy to find stuff isn't very helpful and there isn't much to go with as they were only properly recorded and verified in 1997 after first being detected in 1967:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_gamma-ray_bursts
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma-ray_burst

The galaxy (solar system) of origin is Sagitarrius SGR 1806−20 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SGR_1806%E2%88%9220.
SGR 1806−20 is a magnetar, a type of neutron star with a very powerful magnetic field, that was discovered in 1979 and identified as a soft gamma repeater. SGR 1806−20 is located about 14.5 kiloparsecs (50,000 light-years) from Earth on the far side of the Milky Way in the constellation of Sagittarius. It has a diameter of no more than 20 kilometres (12 mi) and rotates on its axis every 7.5 seconds (30,000 km/h rotation speed at the surface). As of 2016, SGR 1806-20 is the most highly magnetized object ever observed, with a magnetic field over 1015 gauss (G) (1011 tesla) in intensity[1] (compared to the Sun's 1–5 G and Earth's 0.25–0.65 G).

Explosion
Artist's impression of the surrounding cloud bubble
Image

Artist rendering of central neutron star
Image

Fifty thousand years after a starquake occurred on the surface of SGR 1806-20, the radiation from the resultant explosion reached Earth on December 27, 2004 (GRB 041227).[2] In terms of gamma rays, the burst had an absolute magnitude around −29.[a] It was the brightest event known to have been sighted on this planet from an origin outside the Solar System. The magnetar released more energy in one-tenth of a second (1.0×1040 J) than the Sun releases in 150,000 years (4×1026 W × 4.8×1012 s = 1.85×1039 J).[3] Such a burst is thought to be the largest explosion observed in this galaxy by humans since the SN 1604 supernova observed by Johannes Kepler in 1604. The gamma rays struck Earth's ionosphere and created more ionization, which briefly expanded the ionosphere.

A similar blast within 3 parsecs (10 light years) of Earth would destroy the ozone layer and be similar in effect to a 12-kiloton nuclear blast at 7.5 kilometers.[citation needed] The nearest known magnetar to Earth is 1E 1048.1-5937, located 9,000 light-years away in the constellation Carina.

Location
SGR 1806−20 lies at the core of radio nebula G10.0-0.3 and is a member of an open cluster named after it, itself a component of W31, one of the largest H II regions in the Milky Way. Cluster 1806-20 is made up of some highly unusual stars, including at least two carbon-rich Wolf–Rayet stars (WC9d and WCL), two blue hypergiants, and LBV 1806-20, one of the brightest/most massive stars in the galaxy.
That is an insane speed of rotation and seems to be what causes the extereme magnetic field. What i'm curious about is whether the bursts that hit earth are part of the directed beam from the supernova or the general explosion? It seems logical that it's the general burst and the gamma ray exhibits the same effect as a soundwave dispersing first from a large explosion but is far more energetic with the speed of light being broken instead of sound, the FTL equivalent:

Image
In gamma-ray astronomy, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are extremely energetic explosions that have been observed in distant galaxies. They are the brightest electromagnetic events known to occur in the universe.[1] Bursts can last from ten milliseconds to several hours.[2][3][4] After an initial flash of gamma rays, a longer-lived "afterglow" is usually emitted at longer wavelengths (X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, infrared, microwave and radio).[5]
The afterglow seems to be time and space settling down after the burst of energy has passed.

Something of note however, is that the only other recorded burst of that magnitude didn't affect the Schumann-resonance:
The gamma rays lowered the ionosphere over the dayside of the globe and modified the Schumann resonance spectra. [iii] Only two other high-power bursts of cosmic gamma-ray radiation have been recorded in recent decades, the first August 27th, 1998 from the large Magellanic Cloud. No disturbance of the Schumann-resonance was recorded in this case. But in 2004:

“The ionospheric disturbance center was located in the middle of the Pacific at a distance of about 450 km from the center of the dayside hemisphere, […] the gamma-ray burst descended the ionospheric altitude by 20 km, and the disturbance itself existed for an hour.”
I can only think of two explanations, either we were hit by the general explosion for the 1998 burst and "full beam" for the 2004 burst, or perhaps the earthquake was enouraged to happen a military grade ionospheric heater and the coincidence is the gamma ray burst a day later.

What's really interesting is the other stars in the system:
SGR 1806−20 lies at the core of radio nebula G10.0-0.3 and is a member of an open cluster named after it, itself a component of W31, one of the largest H II regions in the Milky Way. Cluster 1806-20 is made up of some highly unusual stars, including at least two carbon-rich Wolf–Rayet stars (WC9d and WCL), two blue hypergiants, and LBV 1806-20, one of the brightest/most massive stars in the galaxy.
Blue hypergiants and one of the brightest most massive stars in the "galaxy", it sounds like a very old system, with the blue hypergiants (gas giants?) burning hot at the end of their life span and binary star LBV 1806-20 could be ready to pop. You'll love this though:
LBV 1806-20 is a candidate luminous blue variable (LBV) and likely binary star located around 28,000 light-years (8,700 pc) from the Sun, towards the center of the Milky Way. It has an estimated mass of around 36 solar masses and an estimated variable luminosity of around two million times that of the Sun. It is highly luminous but is invisible from the Solar System at visual wavelengths because less than one billionth of its visible light reaches us.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LBV_1806-20
So the brightest most massive star in the Milky Way that burns 2 million times that of our sun only lets us see less than 1 billionth of is visible light? Where did all that light go?! ;)

user737
Posts: 75
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Location: Near Colorado Springs, CO

Re: A Gamma ray burst, the Schumann resonance and a Tsunami

Post by user737 » Fri Mar 20, 2020 9:07 am

Djchrismac wrote:
Mon Mar 09, 2020 3:48 pm
The galaxy (solar system) of origin is Sagitarrius SGR 1806−20 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SGR_1806%E2%88%9220.
SGR 1806−20 is a magnetar, a type of neutron star with a very powerful magnetic field, that was discovered in 1979 and identified as a soft gamma repeater. SGR 1806−20 is located about 14.5 kiloparsecs (50,000 light-years) from Earth on the far side of the Milky Way in the constellation of Sagittarius. It has a diameter of no more than 20 kilometres (12 mi) and rotates on its axis every 7.5 seconds (30,000 km/h rotation speed at the surface). As of 2016, SGR 1806-20 is the most highly magnetized object ever observed, with a magnetic field over 1015 gauss (G) (1011 tesla) in intensity[1] (compared to the Sun's 1–5 G and Earth's 0.25–0.65 G).

Explosion
Artist's impression of the surrounding cloud bubble
Image

Artist rendering of central neutron star
Image

Fifty thousand years after a starquake occurred on the surface of SGR 1806-20, the radiation from the resultant explosion reached Earth on December 27, 2004 (GRB 041227).[2] In terms of gamma rays, the burst had an absolute magnitude around −29.[a] It was the brightest event known to have been sighted on this planet from an origin outside the Solar System. The magnetar released more energy in one-tenth of a second (1.0×1040 J) than the Sun releases in 150,000 years (4×1026 W × 4.8×1012 s = 1.85×1039 J).[3] Such a burst is thought to be the largest explosion observed in this galaxy by humans since the SN 1604 supernova observed by Johannes Kepler in 1604. The gamma rays struck Earth's ionosphere and created more ionization, which briefly expanded the ionosphere.

A similar blast within 3 parsecs (10 light years) of Earth would destroy the ozone layer and be similar in effect to a 12-kiloton nuclear blast at 7.5 kilometers.[citation needed] The nearest known magnetar to Earth is 1E 1048.1-5937, located 9,000 light-years away in the constellation Carina.

Location
SGR 1806−20 lies at the core of radio nebula G10.0-0.3 and is a member of an open cluster named after it, itself a component of W31, one of the largest H II regions in the Milky Way. Cluster 1806-20 is made up of some highly unusual stars, including at least two carbon-rich Wolf–Rayet stars (WC9d and WCL), two blue hypergiants, and LBV 1806-20, one of the brightest/most massive stars in the galaxy.
That is an insane speed of rotation and seems to be what causes the extereme magnetic field. What i'm curious about is whether the bursts that hit earth are part of the directed beam from the supernova or the general explosion? It seems logical that it's the general burst and the gamma ray exhibits the same effect as a soundwave dispersing first from a large explosion but is far more energetic with the speed of light being broken instead of sound, the FTL equivalent:

Image
In gamma-ray astronomy, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are extremely energetic explosions that have been observed in distant galaxies. They are the brightest electromagnetic events known to occur in the universe.[1] Bursts can last from ten milliseconds to several hours.[2][3][4] After an initial flash of gamma rays, a longer-lived "afterglow" is usually emitted at longer wavelengths (X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, infrared, microwave and radio).[5]
The afterglow seems to be time and space settling down after the burst of energy has passed.

Something of note however, is that the only other recorded burst of that magnitude didn't affect the Schumann-resonance:
The gamma rays lowered the ionosphere over the dayside of the globe and modified the Schumann resonance spectra. [iii] Only two other high-power bursts of cosmic gamma-ray radiation have been recorded in recent decades, the first August 27th, 1998 from the large Magellanic Cloud. No disturbance of the Schumann-resonance was recorded in this case. But in 2004:

“The ionospheric disturbance center was located in the middle of the Pacific at a distance of about 450 km from the center of the dayside hemisphere, […] the gamma-ray burst descended the ionospheric altitude by 20 km, and the disturbance itself existed for an hour.”
I can only think of two explanations, either we were hit by the general explosion for the 1998 burst and "full beam" for the 2004 burst, or perhaps the earthquake was enouraged to happen a military grade ionospheric heater and the coincidence is the gamma ray burst a day later.

What's really interesting is the other stars in the system:
SGR 1806−20 lies at the core of radio nebula G10.0-0.3 and is a member of an open cluster named after it, itself a component of W31, one of the largest H II regions in the Milky Way. Cluster 1806-20 is made up of some highly unusual stars, including at least two carbon-rich Wolf–Rayet stars (WC9d and WCL), two blue hypergiants, and LBV 1806-20, one of the brightest/most massive stars in the galaxy.
Blue hypergiants and one of the brightest most massive stars in the "galaxy", it sounds like a very old system, with the blue hypergiants (gas giants?) burning hot at the end of their life span and binary star LBV 1806-20 could be ready to pop. You'll love this though:
LBV 1806-20 is a candidate luminous blue variable (LBV) and likely binary star located around 28,000 light-years (8,700 pc) from the Sun, towards the center of the Milky Way. It has an estimated mass of around 36 solar masses and an estimated variable luminosity of around two million times that of the Sun. It is highly luminous but is invisible from the Solar System at visual wavelengths because less than one billionth of its visible light reaches us.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LBV_1806-20
So the brightest most massive star in the Milky Way that burns 2 million times that of our sun only lets us see less than 1 billionth of is visible light? Where did all that light go?! ;)
The strong magnetic field of SGR 1806−20 ("magnetar" - exploded temporal component) lies at the core of radio nebula G10.0-0.3 (exploded spacial component) is caused by thermal motion extending to the second scalar dimension -- the high inverse temperature of the newly-forming white dwarf star is observed as a 2D magnetic motion in equivalent space.

LBV 1806-20 (candidate luminous blue variable) is also nearing supernova due to thermal limit (Type I). If it is indeed a binary pair then the resulting supernova may become a new planetary system when the nearby white dwarf core in that pair is shattered to pieces.

The high-rate spinning is made up to explain away the quantized nature of emissions release from FTL systems. Spin it like a light house and the pulse rate can be "matched" to anything. The "results" becomes quite unbelievable it's a wonder anybody buys it at all.
Infinite Rider on the Big Dogma

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