Miles Mathis Nuclear/Bonding theory

Discussion concerning other (non-RS) systems of theory and the insights obtained from them, as applied to the developing RS2 theory.
User avatar
bperet
Posts: 1199
Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2004 1:43 am
Location: 7.5.3.84.70.24.606
Contact:

Building the table of elements

Post by bperet » Mon Mar 20, 2017 10:57 am

I have not had much luck deciphering the remainder of Mathis' "Nuclear" paper, concerning the bonding of alpha particles and protons in the manner of "stacking CDs". He stops following the idea of "natural consequence" and jumps to "convenient arrangement" to explain the anomalies in the Periodic Table (such as tin, with it's 10 stable isotopes). He seems to be arranging his structures to fit the observed data, rather than deducing the structure from consequences of his theory.

But the idea that there IS a geometry to the rotations inside the time region does make sense, rather than just a compounding of rotational speeds. I have run across this concept before, where it was theorized that the protons arranged themselves along the lines of Platonic solids.

If the time region does have structure, than that interior geometry would be reflected in the exterior space, through equivalent space. Looking around, I find it might be metallic and crystalline bonding systems.

Looking at bonding, in general, I find that:
  • Covalent = geometric; bonds created by orientation of atoms.
  • Ionic = scalar; bonds created by the net, scalar motion of atoms.
  • Van der Waals = gravitational attraction.
The remaining bonding types and the structure of molecules may well have to do with the structure of the atom in the 3D time of the time region, but requires further investigation.
Every dogma has its day...

SoverT
Posts: 46
Joined: Fri Dec 25, 2015 7:27 pm

Re: Building the table of elements

Post by SoverT » Mon Mar 20, 2017 4:56 pm

bperet wrote:
Mon Mar 20, 2017 10:57 am

But the idea that there IS a geometry to the rotations inside the time region does make sense, rather than just a compounding of rotational speeds. I have run across this concept before, where it was theorized that the protons arranged themselves along the lines of Platonic solids.
This is something I immediately ran into when trying to think of motion as a pressure system. It's not a simple scalar , it's a scalar with a bunch of other rules, like occasional dimensional reduction, locked dimensions, dual projective geometries which somehow restrict scalar magnitudes in a non-projective realm, etc. All sorts of shenanigans complicating things.
Relating it back to the computer simulations, Bruce, I'm still curious to see what your code model looks like, as I've not been able to even figure out data structures yet.

User avatar
bperet
Posts: 1199
Joined: Thu Jul 22, 2004 1:43 am
Location: 7.5.3.84.70.24.606
Contact:

Re: Building the table of elements

Post by bperet » Tue Mar 21, 2017 10:16 am

SoverT wrote:
Mon Mar 20, 2017 4:56 pm
This is something I immediately ran into when trying to think of motion as a pressure system. It's not a simple scalar , it's a scalar with a bunch of other rules, like occasional dimensional reduction, locked dimensions, dual projective geometries which somehow restrict scalar magnitudes in a non-projective realm, etc. All sorts of shenanigans complicating things.
Larson's "time region" confuses a lot of people, because he separates it out from conventional space-time by making it "time only." That is actually NOT the case, because you cannot have motion without TWO aspects.

Inside the time region, the "space" aspect is fixed at unity--but it is STILL THERE, so it isn't 1/t, it is 1s/nt. And Larson had to do this because he was a "linear" thinker. BUT, when you add the yin/angular component back in, what you find is that the "time region" is actually the "yin region," where motion is an angular velocity. All rotational structures within the time region are therefore connected to the SAME location in space, because rotation always loops back to where it started (linear doesn't). However, that only applies to primary motion--composites, like birotation, can produce linear-like structures within the time region, such a thermal motion does.

Basically, the "time region" is just a yin/angular expression of the cosmic sector. In the Cosmic, you have linear, 3D time relationships that spread out across the universe. In the time region, you have angular, 3D time relationships, that are stuck at one location.

Thinking of it that way, any structure within the time region would have to be polar (whereas the cosmic would be rectangular). Polar structures are typically polyhedra, such as described by Dr. Robert Moon's research on "Sacred Solids in the Atomic Nucleus." This probably give rise to the "shell" concept of atoms, because it is the only way you have structure surrounding the same, central location.

Now if you add secondary motions that create "linear time" displacements in the time region (called "shift" in projective geometry), the internal structure starts to resemble a molecule--something we see on the outside of the time region. "As above, so below," so it may be that the internal structure is much like external, molecular structure, similar in nature to John Keely's "etheron" -- the particles that make up an atom, which is where conventional science gets "quarks" from.

I think Mathis intuited this with his stacking of CDs. He is still thinking in linear terms, but is basically building polyhedra with them. I still have to investigate it, but I suspect by using polar geometry, the rules to construct the polyhedra may become obvious.
SoverT wrote:
Mon Mar 20, 2017 4:56 pm
Relating it back to the computer simulations, Bruce, I'm still curious to see what your code model looks like, as I've not been able to even figure out data structures yet.
The structures I use are documented in the RS2-109 paper, Dimensional Thinking.

The Java code I am using is on GitHub: ReciprocalSystem/systems.reciprocal
Look in the src/systems/reciprocal/model folder for the data structures to model particles and atoms. I have not updated it in a while, as I've been busy with other things. Of course, with this new info, I may have to do a rewrite!
Every dogma has its day...

Post Reply