Properties of Monatomic Ions

Discussion concerning the first major re-evaluation of Dewey B. Larson's Reciprocal System of theory, updated to include counterspace (Etheric spaces), projective geometry, and the non-local aspects of time/space.
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user737
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Properties of Monatomic Ions

Post by user737 » Sat Apr 27, 2019 12:02 pm

Would appreciate some discussion on the below points as translation from execu-speak to RS2 often requires thoughtful consideration.
The electrons in the outermost shell (the ones with the highest value of n) are the most energetic, and are the ones which are exposed to other atoms. This shell is known as the valence shell. The inner, core electrons (inner shell) do not usually play a role in chemical bonding.
Energy, t/s, is counter-spacial and forms shells of harmonics and phase relationships to create what we observe from our 3D spacial reference frame to be a series of concentric spheres in space. Due to inversion of observation at the unit boundary, even though outward in counter-space is towards the point at infinity, the reciprocal nature of space and time provides for the "opposite"... the whole structure must be observed as inside-out. i.e. the inner-most shell in 3D time becomes our outer-most shell in 3D space.
Elements with similar properties generally have similar outer shell configurations. For instance, we already know that the alkali metals (Group I) always form ions with a +1 charge; the "extra" s1 electron is the one that's lost.
Bonding is not caused by sharing or exchanging electrons, valence or otherwise. Bonding occurs when atoms geometrically arrange in space (or not) as to create a zero net-speed for the overall arrangement.
The next shell down is now the outermost shell, which is now full — meaning there is very little tendency to gain or lose more electrons. The ion's electron configuration is the same as the nearest noble gas — the ion is said to be isoelectronic with the nearest noble gas. Atoms "prefer" to have a filled outermost shell because this is more electronically stable.
Love the quotes about 'prefer.' More electronically stable = closer to zero net speed? i.e. less "reactive"?

Source: https://www.angelo.edu/faculty/kboudrea ... umbers.htm

Reference: Martin S. Silberberg, Chemistry: The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 2nd ed. Boston: McGraw-Hill, 2000, p. 277-284, 293-307.
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user737
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Re: Properties of Monatomic Ions

Post by user737 » Sat Apr 27, 2019 12:21 pm

More...
In a ground state configuration, all of the electrons are in as low an energy level as it is possible for them to be. When an electron absorbs energy, it occupies a higher energy orbital, and is said to be in an excited state.
Increase in energy is recognized as increase in aspect of motion defined as ratio of t/s.

More time per space or outward from the perspective of time/space and so also outward from a space/time perspective albeit inverted as observed from the other side of the unit boundary -- outward toward the point at infinity in counter-space & outward toward the plane at infinity in space being equivalent. An increase in energy is therefore misconstrued as an electron "jumping" to a "higher" orbital shell.
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user737
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Re: Properties of Monatomic Ions

Post by user737 » Sat Apr 27, 2019 12:38 pm

Spin Quantum Number:
Specifies the orientation of the spin axis of an electron. An electron can spin in only one of two directions (sometimes called up and down).
Instead, let's call these inward and outward (in space or time).
The Pauli exclusion principle (Wolfgang Pauli, Nobel Prize 1945) states that no two electrons in the same atom can have identical values for all four of their quantum numbers. What this means is that no more than two electrons can occupy the same orbital, and that two electrons in the same orbital must have opposite spins.
Rule by definition. Only one occupant per absolute location in space.
Because an electron spins, it creates a magnetic field, which can be oriented in one of two directions.
Indeed, outward in space (inward in time) or inward in space (outward in time).
For two electrons in the same orbital, the spins must be opposite to each other; the spins are said to be paired.
This feels like an artificial construct of this system as defined. Not sure how to translate this to RS2.
These substances are not attracted to magnets and are said to be diamagnetic.
Makes sense. Cancel the magnetic moment and there is no "force of attraction."
Atoms with more electrons that spin in one direction than another contain unpaired electrons. These substances are weakly attracted to magnets and are said to be paramagnetic.
Is the confusion here that in conventional science "electrons" and "protons" map one-to-one (insofar as the atom has no ionic charge) and so what we're really observing is an in-balance in the magnetic rotation of the "proton"/"neutron" bi-rotational pairs which would then seek balance... i.e. "magnetic attraction"?
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user737
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Re: Properties of Monatomic Ions

Post by user737 » Sat Apr 27, 2019 12:49 pm

Angular Momentum (Secondary, Azimunthal) Quantum Number (l)
Is not angular momentum in the time region just another way of saying mass (i.e. equivalent energy) in equivalent space?

Momentum is defined as t2/s2 and being angular increases the observed dimensionality in equivalent space (is this a fair application of principle?)

i.e. 2D → 3D with t3/s3 being mass or three-dimensional energy
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user737
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Re: Properties of Monatomic Ions

Post by user737 » Sat Apr 27, 2019 1:01 pm

Principal Quantum Number
This must be the magnetic ionization level although we know this can't go to infinity.
Limit is 4-4?
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