Astronomers Know Sun is getting hotter

Discussion concerning other (non-RS) systems of theory and the insights obtained from them, as applied to the developing RS2 theory.
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bperet
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Astronomers Know Sun is getting hotter

Post by bperet » Sat Jan 08, 2005 7:16 pm

I ran across this interesting note in the book, Road in the Sky, by George Hunt Williamson (1959):

Quote:
Dr. Jason J. Nassau, director of the Warner-Swasey Observatory, Cleveland, Ohio, attended the International Science Symposium held recently in Rome, Italy. On July 1, 1957, he reported:

Dr. Nassau wrote:
The earth is seen racing to a hot, not a cold, end. Our world will end twice as quickly as science has expected. Our sun is not dying as formerly supposed, but is growing brighter and hotter. Oceans will eventually boil away. Our sun is absorbing material to put forth more energy.
The conclusions reached at the International Science Symposium were incredible. Our sun is absorbing material to put forth more energy.
This is the same thing Larson said, about the same time. The sun eats rock and dust for energy; it is not burning out, but getting brighter and hotter. I have to wonder what happened to "modern" astronomical thought in the 48 years since then... and it agrees with what Ra said back in 1981.
Every dogma has its day...

MikeWirth
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Astronomers Know Sun is getting hotter

Post by MikeWirth » Thu Jan 13, 2005 12:57 pm

Nehru's "Glimpses into the Structure of the Sun" papers do make alot of sense as pertains to the increasing sunspot activity and therefore more active thredules being produced as a result of the sun's gain in mass/energy. I read where the sun is presently in a dust cloud region so accretion is most likely going to continue. We had that "little ice age" a few hundred years ago and there was a "solar minimum" period but maybe there was a brief shortage of metals migrating to the core which initially had been accreted several million years ago.

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Solar System entering dust cloud

Post by bperet » Thu Jan 13, 2005 3:18 pm

MikeWirth wrote:
I read where the sun is presently in a dust cloud region so accretion is most likely going to continue.
David Wilcock and Richard Hoagland (the Enterprise Mission) have been passing me their data on the observations of the entire solar system heating up. I don't agree with some of their conclusions; but based on Larson's astronomy, the presence of a large amount of fine dust would account for the same things. And now that has been found -- it appears the solar system is entering a large cloud of atomic dust, roughly spherical, and about 100 light years in diameter. It is very thin, but is already obscuring some of the starlight we receive.

Based on the size and irregular density patterns, I believe we are intersecting a newly-forming globular cluster that is being pulled into the disc of the galaxy. The density gradients are where stars are beginning to form -- with, curiously enough, higher thermal and cosmic ray emissions than the background, just as Larson predicted.

This will make everything in the system hotter, and the presence of excess dust in the atmosphere will create higher-than-normal precipition levels.

MikeWirth wrote:
We had that "little ice age" a few hundred years ago and there was a "solar minimum" period but maybe there was a brief shortage of metals migrating to the core which initially had been accreted several million years ago.
Curious thing about that is that it might be the other way around -- heavy metals migrating to the surface from the core, since the ultra-high motions within the core will generate an anti-gravity field, and the heaviest metals would therefore be pushed the furthest from the core.

Anyway, given the heat-up of the solar system and the amount of ice in the polar caps -- might be a good idea to brush up on swimming. :)
Every dogma has its day...

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