The Mass of Sound

Discussion concerning the first major re-evaluation of Dewey B. Larson's Reciprocal System of theory, updated to include counterspace (Etheric spaces), projective geometry, and the non-local aspects of time/space.
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duane
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The Mass of Sound

Post by duane » Fri Aug 24, 2018 5:07 pm

is sound a source of anti-gravity?

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1807.08771.pdf

The Mass of Sound

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bperet
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Re: The Mass of Sound

Post by bperet » Sat Aug 25, 2018 11:51 am

The "starch and water" experiment demonstrates that, where you place liquefied starch on a speaker, than play music and it solidifies and jumps around, much higher than the vertical motion of the speaker can account for.
They hide it under a "non-Newtonian fluid." As Gopi has pointed out, it seems that most of Nature is actually "non-Newtonian."
Every dogma has its day...

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bperet
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Re: The Mass of Sound

Post by bperet » Sat Aug 25, 2018 1:13 pm

V. Conclusions wrote:We showed that, contrary to common belief, sound waves carry gravitational mass, in a standard Newtonian sense: they are affected by gravity, but they also source gravity. Our results show that this effect goes hand-inhand with the non-linear interactions of sound, and that this is true for superfluids, ordinary fluids, and solids. In particular, for all these media, in the non-relativistic limit the mass transported by a sound wave is proportional to its energy times a coefficient that only depends on the medium’s equation of state.
Let's put this in terms of the Reciprocal System...

First, what is gravity? If you don't know, read Beyond Newton: An Explanation of Gravitation.

Simply put, gravitation is inward scalar motion, which opposes the progression, outward scalar motion.

In the material sector, gravitation is inward in space and outward in time.
In the cosmic sector, gravitation is inward in time and outward in space.

So why don't we just call the "outward" bit, "progression?" Because the progression is of the natural reference system, the universe is flying apart at the speed of light, and there isn't anything we can do about it. But, in a gravitationally-bound system, there can exist outward motions that cancel the inward motions, to allow the progression to have effect. This is most easily seen in heat, where thermal motion is inward in time and outward in space. The bonds between atoms are inward in space, so they get canceled out by the spatial outward aspect of thermal motion.

Sound is a pressure wave, which means it also has properties similar to heat. High pressure pushes things apart--outward. Low pressure (vacuum) pulls things together--inward. So any high pressure system, such as those created by sound, are outward in space and will therefore neutralize a small component of the inward motion of an aggregate, giving the appearance of a tiny mass.

Conventional science has bifurcated too many times and is currently going chaotic, which is why we have papers like this--trying to make sense out of a system that no longer makes sense.
In a dynamical system, a bifurcation is a period doubling, quadrupling, etc., that accompanies the onset of chaos. It represents the sudden appearance of a qualitatively different solution for a nonlinear system as some parameter is varied. The illustration above shows bifurcations (occurring at the location of the blue lines) of the logistic map as the parameter r is varied. Bifurcations come in four basic varieties: flip bifurcation, fold bifurcation, pitchfork bifurcation, and transcritical bifurcation (Rasband 1990).
Notice all the references to "nonlinear"... a concept Larson was distinctly opposed to (why "Euclidean geometry" was included in his postulates--to combat the nonlinear gurus).

Understanding the RS is simplest if you can think in terms of "push" and "pull"... not vectors.
Every dogma has its day...

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