Sonoluminescence

Discussion concerning the first major re-evaluation of Dewey B. Larson's Reciprocal System of theory, updated to include counterspace (Etheric spaces), projective geometry, and the non-local aspects of time/space.
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Gopi
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Sonoluminescence

Post by Gopi » Sun Oct 25, 2009 10:22 am

I was looking at the different mechanisms generally used to multiple frequencies, and hit upon an old friend, sonoluminiscence.

Basically, this is a process where, by setting up acoustic standing waves in water at ultrasonic freqencies, at resonance, one can see that the bubbles of air in the water implode with a bluish-white light flash. So far conventional physics has no explanation of this process.

There are two factors that are there worth noticing. One is that the effect is happening at an interface: the liquid-vapor interface of the bubble with the water. Secondly, at resonance, this creates a light flash which is roughly 600 THz in frequency, while the starting frequency was nothing but 25 kHz (based on the experiments done). This gives us an order of magnitude of nearly 24 x 109 in the change of frequency. This is roughly the range of the speed of light!

I am not sure what I am getting at here, but apparently by doing it at the interface, we are gaining the reduction of a dimension of motion. In other words, by setting up resonant systems, one can get the same effect as that of cooling stuff down to very low temperatures. Another clue is the fact that by reducing the temperature of the water, the flashes grew brighter, which means we are augmenting the effect.

Gopi
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Sonoluminescence continued

Post by Gopi » Sun Aug 28, 2011 5:38 pm

With the understanding of longitudinal waves provided with the photon concept, it is simple enough to see that a "pressure wave" as developed in a liquid is nothing but scalar vibration.

The normal behavior that is observed is that at a high static pressure, the bubble is smaller, while at low pressure, the bubble grows bigger, and finally rupturing when the the pressure is low enough. This is observed by any deep-sea diver as he sees the air bubbles he breathes out.

Now, consider the fact that in setting up a liquid in vibration, one is changing from the uniform spatial variation, to an alternating spatial variation, and uniform temporal variation: a specific frequency. I am still not clear on this part, but it appears that the reverse happens, and greater pressure areas attract the LARGER bubbles, while the smaller pressure areas attract the smaller bubbles.

Now with this behavior, the greater the pressure, the bigger the bubble, and that leads to something called coalescence. It is not actually a coalescence, but more of an expansion, by a decrease in density. The bubble however, cannot just expand indefinitely, it can only do so up to its own "size limit", after which explodes, in time. This is nothing but an implosion, in space, and also not one single implosion, but a series of regularly spaced implosions, as it happens in time.

In other words, a sonoluminescence bubble is a pulsar in the water.

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bperet
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In other words, a

Post by bperet » Fri Sep 02, 2011 4:04 pm

In other words, a sonoluminescence bubble is a pulsar in the water.
If the nature of sonoluminescense is from supraluminal motion, as in a pulsar, then it should be quantized and discontinuous in clock time--in other words, it won't just "light up", but should flash at a consistent rate. Has anyone measured the periodicity of the flashes from a single bubble?

The light may also be "charge burnoff," analogous to radio emission but on a different wavelength. I noticed that the blue-white color contains a lot of uV, which puts in near a material-cosmic boundary (between hard and soft uV). It may be that the collapse is causing pair formation and 1D rotation is becoming SHM. (That would be more like a nova flare than a pulsar.)
Every dogma has its day...

Gopi
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Periodicity

Post by Gopi » Fri Sep 09, 2011 7:09 am

It does flash, at periodic intervals, but the flashes decay over time, probably because of the surrounding material medium instead of vacuum. Nevertheless the flashing exists. Take a look at one of the represeantative diagrams (a reasonably accurate one, by comparison with the experiments)

http://www.annualreviews.org/na101/home ... 659.f1.gif

Gopi

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