New, so I am saying hello

This forum is dedicated to the student just starting out with the concepts of the Reciprocal System, or RS2. Questions and clarifications for the RS/RS2 concepts go here; please place new ideas and commentary in the appropriate RS2 fora.
Detrix
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New, so I am saying hello

Post by Detrix » Tue May 07, 2013 7:32 pm

Hi everyone. My name is Jeret. I have been studying the Reciprocal System for about 5 months. I have the general idea of Larson's RS, and now I am getting a good understanding of RS2 view. I am a software developer (as a hobby at the moment), and want to help in this regard. I am a Linux advocate, and I can program in C/C++, Java, and Python. I use the open source program called "Blender" for 3D rendering (its free), which has a Python interface. I just started to read about your discussions on 3D models and wanted to express my desire to help promote RS2. I like 3D modeling and prgramming, so how can I get involved?

Here is an example of what I have done in Java, about 10 years ago.

http://www.novasector.net:4280/java3D

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bperet
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J3d of birotation

Post by bperet » Wed May 08, 2013 11:18 am

Hi Jeret, welcome to RS2. Could certainly use some graphics help! I'm assuming you are using OpenGL with J3D, since you're a Linux person?

I've been wanting to do an interactive graphic to assist in visualizing the projection of scalar motion into the material and cosmic sectors. I think that would really help people understand the Reciprocal System if they can get in there and change various scalar speeds, and observe the results in 3D space and 3D time. It would require multiple perspectives; basically an interactive viewport where one could adjust scalar speeds in the ratio fo space:time, and others to view what you would see in 3D space, 3D time, and the projection of 3D time into 3D space as "equivalent space."

Maybe you could start out with just a visualization of birotation, as mentioned by duane. What you would need there is just three input variables, speed for rotation A, speed for rotation B, and the axial separation (0 or 1 natural unit). Then use the Euler formulas to produce the sine and cosine projections, showing the resulting wave pattern that is orthogonal to the birotation. Care to give it a try?

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Detrix
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Helping

Post by Detrix » Thu May 09, 2013 8:08 am

Greetings, thanks for getting back so quickly. I will be using Python, with OpenGL, but my OpenGL experience is not so great, but I do have some experience in 3D programming (the hard way, no graphics library, just my own functions). But "Blender" is a 3D modeling program available on Linux, windows, and macs.

I am reading as much as I can so I can help, but my understanding of the rotations, is lacking. I have watched several of your videos with Doug, and I am getting it. I am not an artist, but I do well when I need to, and with the program called "Gimp" I can do some cool stuff.

Are you on Google Plus? Its like facebook, but I wont go near facebook. With Google+ we can do video conferences with 10 people. I started a Google+ community on Reciprocal Theory. I got Doug to join it. I would love to do a video conference with both or either of you. With Google+ video chat, I can show you my desktop and show my graphics.

I think getting a visualization of the bi-rotation is a very good start. I will see what I can do.

Jeret

Detrix
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bi-rotation visualization

Post by Detrix » Thu May 09, 2013 4:45 pm

Again, my current understanding of the bi-rotation is this: a single rotation of a vibration is a circle, then rotating the circle creates a sphere. Now if two independent rotations (circles) combine just right, a shperoid (kinda egg shaped; ellipsish shpere). I will keep reading and watching your lectures.

Jeret

ps. here is a sample of what I have done with Blender (its an unfinished project of the lobby of a building). Geek Group lobby

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bperet
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Birotation math

Post by bperet » Thu May 09, 2013 4:56 pm

I am reading as much as I can so I can help, but my understanding of the rotations, is lacking.
I would recommend you use complex quantities, so you can express rotation as a simple, imaginary exponent function (cmath.exp() in Python, which has native support for complex numbers). The equation for rotation is very simple:

\Large r = a \times e^{i(\theta + \phi)}

Where:

a = amplitude

θ = angular velocity (angle multiplied by your animation clock)

Φ = phase angle

The result is a complex number, where the "real" component is your X-axis value, and the imaginary component is the Y-axis value. You can just add the two complex results together to get the birotation--no trig involved!

If your tools use the standard coordinate system (X-right, Y-up, Z-into screen) you can run your clock down the Z axis and leave a trail of the two waveforms of the birotations, real in the XZ plane, and imaginary in the YZ plane. That way you can see the rotations spinning, as well as the waveform they are leaving behind.
Are you on Google Plus?
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bperet
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Birotation v 2D rotation

Post by bperet » Thu May 09, 2013 5:00 pm

a single rotation of a vibration is a circle, then rotating the circle creates a sphere.
Birotations are coplanar (1D); rotation-1 overlaps rotation-2. What you are describing is Larson's magnetic rotation (2D).
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Detrix
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this helps

Post by Detrix » Thu May 09, 2013 7:29 pm

Thanks for the assist. I just want to make sure I am reading this correctly (making no assumptions), e is the natural log? And i is the increment of the loop along the y axis?

Jeret

Detrix
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so you can express rotation

Post by Detrix » Thu May 09, 2013 7:43 pm

so you can express rotation as a simple, imaginary exponent function
Ok I see, but it has been a long time since I have played with these functions. May take a bit to refresh my memory.

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clarification

Post by Detrix » Fri May 10, 2013 6:16 pm

The result is a complex number, where the "real" component is your X-axis value, and the imaginary component is the Y-axis value. You can just add the two complex results together to get the birotation--no trig involved
so I need to do this for both rotations to get two complex numbers to add? Is that correct? Sorry for the lack of understanding. But I want to get this right.

Jeret

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bperet
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Birotation Python code

Post by bperet » Fri May 10, 2013 7:12 pm

I just want to make sure I am reading this correctly (making no assumptions), e is the natural log?
'e' is the exponent (based on Euler's number, e, which is the base of the natural log).

The Python function is cmath.exp(), so you would need to provide the angle as an imaginary number:

Code: Select all

theta = 1;
phi = 0;
rot1 = cmath.exp(complex(0,theta*(clock*math.pi*2)+phi))
rot1.real would be the X coordinate and rot1.imag the Y coordinate of the rotation about the Z axis.

In most animations, clock runs from 0-1 by frames to complete a cyclic animation. Theta is a speed multiplier, phi is a phase angle, in radians. Multiplying the clock by 2pi gives you a full circle for each animation cycle, then the theta can increase the speed by integer steps.
And i is the increment of the loop along the y axis?
'i' is the rotational operator (j in Python, as in 1+2j to define a complex number), used to indicate an imaginary quantity.
so I need to do this for both rotations to get two complex numbers to add?
Yes.

Add rot2 with the variables for the 2nd rotation. You can then plot both the rotations as circles, or radius/arc, or whatever looks best, based on the (rot1.real,rot1.imag,0) and (rot2.real,rot2.imag,0).

birot = rot1+rot2

And the birotation will move according to the (x,y,z) of (birot.real,birot.imag,0).
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