Search found 1196 matches

by bperet
Fri Jul 20, 2018 8:12 pm
Forum: Electricity and Electronics
Topic: Dielectric Fields
Replies: 9
Views: 460

Re: Dielectric Fields

I'm curious if the duration of time where you observed CPM spikes was the same length as the magnetic fallout duration disabling your electronics. I expect you didn't sit there 12 hours in a row testing to see if it was still reproducible though! It caught me by surprise and the spikes were only a ...
by bperet
Fri Jul 20, 2018 10:59 am
Forum: Electricity and Electronics
Topic: Dielectric Fields
Replies: 9
Views: 460

Re: Dielectric Fields

Been running more dielectric field experiments... giving me some unusual and unexpected results. I was using Geiger counter alignment disks (thorium 232) that each produce about 60 CPM (1 per second), so the meter was clicking irregularly, varying from about 110-125 CPM, but steady. Fluxuations occu...
by bperet
Wed Jul 18, 2018 11:48 am
Forum: Electricity and Electronics
Topic: Magnetism
Replies: 9
Views: 504

Ice Penitentes

I thought these magnetic spikes looked familiar... turns out that at high latitudes--where the Earth's magnetic poles tend to be--there exists a phenomena known as "ice penitentes," for which there are many theories about--but I don't think anyone considered the idea that it may be the magnetic infl...
by bperet
Tue Jul 17, 2018 6:45 pm
Forum: Electricity and Electronics
Topic: Magnetism
Replies: 9
Views: 504

Magnetic pole in 3D

I got some "ferrofluid" ... a magnetic fluid. Strange to see a magnet stick to liquid. I used my USB microscope to get a close look at a magnetic pole of a magnet. Interesting stuff. It is a spiked hemisphere: . vlcsnap-2018-07-17-18h10m06s224.png vlcsnap-2018-07-17-18h11m17s863.png vlcsnap-2018-07-...
by bperet
Sun Jul 15, 2018 10:25 am
Forum: Electricity and Electronics
Topic: Dielectric Fields
Replies: 9
Views: 460

Dielectric Fields

The dielectric field, ψ, is a concept popularized by Eric Dollard from his Borderland Sciences lectures back in the 1980s. It is the electric analog to a magnetic field that has no magnetic component . This differs from the conventional EM field, which has both components. The dielectric field is co...
by bperet
Fri Jul 13, 2018 11:56 am
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: How can a translational change affect structure?
Replies: 9
Views: 539

Re: Schauberger cycloid spiral analysis

Ah, I was mislead by the (mis) interpretation in the writings I have. The book I have indicates that the vortex motion takes warm water and cools it, and the cooling causes contraction and a consequent vacuum suction. Seemed plausible so I assumed it was correct. Just examine his log flume designs....
by bperet
Thu Jul 12, 2018 10:00 am
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: How can a translational change affect structure?
Replies: 9
Views: 539

Schauberger cycloid spiral analysis

Clearly a rotational motion, so why doesn't it keep moving in a circle on your table forever, since rotation is primary? Because it's movement, not motion. This is the issue I have with understanding how translational movement converts to motion. First, that is not rotation, it is translation in 2 ...
by bperet
Thu Jul 12, 2018 9:26 am
Forum: LRC Research
Topic: Meeting a Terrific Challenge
Replies: 43
Views: 9618

Higgs Boson

Keep in mind that there are two factors missing from LST: No cosmic sector (3D time). No progression of the natural reference system at the atomic level. The Higgs boson/field is their device to compensate for these missing factors. This is somewhat revealing: If the Higgs field did not exist, parti...
by bperet
Tue Jul 10, 2018 8:22 am
Forum: LRC Research
Topic: Meeting a Terrific Challenge
Replies: 43
Views: 9618

Re: Meeting a Terrific Challenge

I suffer the pain, though, because I want to understand the Higgs boson, the Higgs field and the Higgs mechanism, since it's so highly regarded by them and they have been hoping to find it for so long and now that they think they have found it, at least the boson, you have to give them credit. The ...
by bperet
Mon Jul 09, 2018 8:59 am
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: How can a translational change affect structure?
Replies: 9
Views: 539

Re: How can a translational change affect structure?

A piece of the puzzle I only recently learned was that the density of water changes at the temperature of 4C. This is likely the "point of anomaly" that he refers to. Yes, it is. It is the point of maximum density and minimum volume. Heat or cool it further, and water will expand. That behavior ind...